Animal Testing: Absolutely Not!

Caroline Price, Writer

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Lately, new and improved products have been tested on animals, and it is harmful, and yet helpful.  But, as great as the pros may seem, drugs that have passed animal tests aren’t necessarily safe, animal tests do not reliably predict results in human beings, and most experiments involving animals are flawed, wasting the lives of the animal subjects. Now, what do you say? Do you think there should be animal testing? Do you disagree? Or, do you not yet have an opinion?

First, drugs that pass animal tests aren’t necessarily safe. The website procon.org states, “The 1950s sleeping pill thalidomide, which caused 10,000 babies to be born with severe deformities, was tested on animals prior to its commercial release. Later tests on pregnant mice, rats, guinea pigs, cats, and hamsters did not result in birth defects unless the drug was administered at extremely high doses.” This means that because of test results, over 10,000 babies were born with deformities. This was all because of the test results, which were made with animal subjects.

Also, animal tests do not reliably predict results in human beings. According to procon.org, “The low predictivity of animal experiments in research areas allowing direct comparisons of mouse versus human data puts strong doubt on the usefulness of animal data as key technology to predict human safety.” This proves that due to the doubt of animal data being a part of human safety, the predicaments of having animal testings be safe is very low.

Finally, most experiments involving animals are flawed, wasting the lives of animal subjects. Another procon.org fact claims, “87% of the studies failed to randomize the selection of animals and 86% did not use “blinding”. Also, “only 59% of the studies stated the hypothesis or objective of the study and the number and characteristics of the animals used.” A 2017 study found further flaws in animal studies including “incorrect data interpretation, unforeseen technical issues, incorrectly constituted (or absent) control groups, selective data reporting, inadequate or varying software systems, and blatant fraud.” Since the majority of animals used in biomedical research are killed during or after the experiments, and since many suffer during the studies, the lives and wellbeing of animals are routinely sacrificed for poor research.” This explains that animals can be in terrible conditions, or even facing death after being a test animal subject.

Hence, there shouldn’t be animal testing because of drugs that pass animal tests aren’t necessarily safe, animal tests do not reliably predict results in human beings, and most experiments involving animals are flawed, wasting the lives of animal subjects. Now, after reading this article, what’s your final opinion? What do you have to say about animal testing?

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Animal Testing: Absolutely Not!